How To Put Your Best Foot Forward In An Interview

Ally Cole, brand manager for ELOC Global, speaks with Gary Edwards, President of ERS Antenna, about tips for putting your best foot forward in an interview.

Gary explains

That interview success starts before the interview even starts and that the interviewee should do their homework on the company, including the specific people who will be doing the interviewing (if possible). This research enables an interviewee to appear organized, meticulous, and well-prepared, which raises the chances of landing the job exponentially more than appearing unorganized or unprepared. Even though the interviewee answers most of the questions, when asked if they have any questions of their own, the interviewee should have some well thought out questions ready and not consider that part of the interview a throwaway. The topic of money is bound to come up, whether in the first interview or a later one. When it does, the best way for the interviewee to address that topic is to say something similar to “I don’t have a figure in mind, the job is more important than the salary, so if there’s a good fit I’m sure we’ll come up with a figure that is mutually beneficial for the both of us.” Body language is also an important interviewing component. Your body language says a lot of things you might not be aware of. Before the interview, practice looking people in the eye and carrying yourself (via body language) with confidence.

When you can tell the interview is almost over, such as when you are being walked to the door, that is a key time to make your last impression/pitch that you want the job. A nice touch would be to repeat back to the interviewer something specific about the company said during the interview and add “…I like that and that is why I want to work here.” Lastly, when exchanging pleasantries like “it was nice to meet you, thank you for your time…,” that is a good point to say something that will leave no doubt about your level of interest in the position. Even after the interview is over, there are things you can do to augment a successful interview and stand out from the crowd, such as emailing the interviewer(s) a thank you note/card. This is obviously easier to do if you receive business cards from the interviewer(s).

If you have any follow up questions for Ally, you can email Ally at ally@elocglobal.com.

Key Takeaways

• The topic of money is bound to come up, whether in the first interview or a later one. When it does, the best way for the interviewee to address that topic is to say something similar to “I don’t have a figure in mind, the job is more important than the salary, so if there’s a good fit I’m sure we’ll come up with a figure that is mutually beneficial for the both of us.”

• Even after the interview is over, there are things you can do to augment a successful interview and stand out from the crowd, such as emailing the interviewer(s) a thank you note/card.